ireland travel

Uh, Hey, We’re in Ireland! (Our European Adventure: Day 1)

June 13th, 2019:

So there we were. Overstuffed backpacks making our shoulders ache, wheeled suitcases constantly hitting bumps and threatening to topple over, and ankles far too bare for the unexpected wind that welcomed us into the Dublin morning. After 13 hours of travel, my family had landed in Ireland and were making our way to our European rental car, which promised a complete shattering of muscle memory.

Our plan was to make our way around Ireland in four days, and had decided to forego a bus and a designated schedule in favor of a terrifying adventure on the wrong side of the rode, a passionate new dedication and reliance on the design of Apple Maps, and the freedom to stop for pee breaks whenever we wanted. The pro and con list really could have been a novel in itself.

So there we were, in our just big enough car for a family of five with five suitcases, five backpacks and a lot of emotional baggage provoked by sleep deprivation. But alas, my dad started the car—from passenger seat, so it seemed—and we skittered into the streets of Dublin, each of us wondering if this was such a good idea.

Now, for any of you who have read my blog before, you might know that my sister and I went to Ireland a few years ago. And if pictures from that trip are any indication, we were disgusted to be back. I mean, imagine having to look at this for a SECOND time.

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Aside from simply wanting to visit this friendly, welcoming and beautiful country again, our main reason for making Ireland our first destination was to show my mom, dad, and brother the country that had stolen our hearts. We wanted them to see what our (pristinely executed) slideshow from three years ago couldn’t. And although we showed them ridiculously unmoving, definitely not borderline spiritual photos like this:

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…they still agreed to come along.

Our first stop after landing was the Guinness Storehouse, (pro tip: buy your tickets online in advanced to save money, skip the line and get a free pint!) where my sister, Natalee, and I had previously become “certified Guinness pourers.” We were excited for our family to achieve this status so we could finally stop looking down on them.

Our reservation was for 4:30 p.m., and although we landed late and took a few (or six) wrong turns trying to navigate our way through the city streets, we were still running a little early by the time we parked in a nearby parking structure and made our way to the front door. So to kill time we headed to Harkin’s, a pub in walking distance from the Storehouse, and dove headfirst into some burgers, beers, and Irish coffees.

As we ate, we met up with the other half of our adventure crew: the Stevens. My cousin Taryn had just finished up a three-week study abroad stint in Ireland and was the catalyst for our entire vacation/hijacking of her family’s vacation. What started as a “wouldn’t it be crazy to meet you in Ireland?” was suddenly a very real, “uh, hey, we’re in IRELAND!”

Once we finished our meal, we made our first walk as the newly imposing yet undeniably fabulous group of nine. We took our tour of the Storehouse, were all successfully certified (and recertified) and shared our first (and free!) pints of Guinness.

To my absolute unsurprise I still hated it.

Back at our car, we were met with our first dose of pure luck and (undoubtedly) heaven sent Irish hospitality. Being from Southern California, you’d think we’d be better equipped at reading street signs and might notice that our parking structure closed at 7:00 p.m. To our great fortune however, even though it was nearing 8:00 p.m., a security guard just so happened so be walking by and was able to unlock the gate, saving us a €100 retrieval fee, and a whole lot of over exhausted family angst. Slainte, you broad, Irish angel.

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In the planning of this trip, we had a lot of conversations as to how we wanted to get around Ireland, where we wanted to stay, etc. My sister and I had previously taken a clockwise route around the country, making pit stops in five main cities (Dublin, Cork, Gallway, Londonderry and Belfast) and so initially I assumed we’d do the same thing. However, in looking up lodging, I found that that route was going to be pricey. So, instead we opted to pick a city in the middle of the country to act as our home base—at least for the first couple days.

Which is how we wound up at the gate of this Airbnb in Mullingar.

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photo credit: Airbnb (check out the profile and rates for this place here. It’s way more affordable than it looks!)

Though it was a bit of a trek, the hosts, Carmel and Fintan, were incredibly charming and made us feel so at home that we were able to unload, unpack and crash—hard.

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As I lay there in the moments before falling asleep, with the Irish countryside sitting right outside my window, the trip became both real and completely unfathomable all at the same time. I knew we’d made it, to both this country, this house and this adventure, but I also wondered if I’d wake up the next morning and it would all be a dream.

Spoiler alert: it wasn’t.

50 Shades of Goodbye (Last Day in Ireland)

If Day 7 was weird to wake up to, Day 8 was worse. Since Natalee and I didn’t fly out until 12:30, we were able to take our time getting ready. That morning, I woke up with my focus primarily on making sure everything was in place for our trip home. I collected my things, double, triple, quadruple checking I had my passport, and I wrapped my souvenirs tightly in the hope that none of them would break on the way home.

While I was packing my suitcase, I came to find that the only way I was going to get it to shut was if I reorganized the entire thing. When I left, everything had fit perfectly, neatly. I’d organized it down to the inch. But as I looked at it now, it was kind of a disaster. So, I sat down in the middle of the floor, removed everything one by one and put them in piles around me. And even though I grew frustrated at first, trying and failing and then trying again to making everything fit, I started to realize that I simply had to approach it differently than I had at home. Because like me, my suitcase was different than it was when I started. With each city it had collected little things, memories, pictures, souvenirs, and they changed its shape, changed how it fit together. And so as I again began to make sense of everything, I began to appreciate these differences and I was thankful for them, because I knew that when I got back home and unpacked everything, I’d still have those new pieces I’d collected here and they would stay with me. Further down the road, when the trip becomes more of a distant memory, I know I’ll come across these pieces, in perhaps the most unexpected of ways and I’ll remember how they changed me, how they helped me grow and I’ll be able to look back at them and smile.

Once I fit the last few things inside my suitcase and zipped it shut, Natalee and I did one last look around our room.

“Is that everything?” I asked, and she nodded, opening up the door for us to roll our suitcases out the door and down the hall.

When we got downstairs, we handed the attendant our room keys and asked him to call us a taxi to the airport. Once the taxi arrived, we quickly walked outside, loaded our bags and got in, the initial action of which seemed like it had only just happened, as if this taxi driver should be that same man who talked football with us only a short time ago.

As he drove, I looked around at all the cars driving past. Some were taxis, perhaps shuttling tourists like us, some were families going somewhere on a Wednesday morning, and some were singles or couples, talking or laughing or sitting silently. In all the driving I’d done for work, I’d seen all these combinations before, and now here I was on the opposite end of the world seeing their mirror image. It made me realize how many worlds there are in our world. How many lives are all happening at the very same time, most of which we’ll never know about. But as the taxi driver continued down the highway to the airport, I realized how many lives I’d gotten to be a part of over the last week. Both those in our group, and those of people I’d met in restaurants and gift shops and pubs. We’d all shared something, even if it was brief. And I think that’s one of the greatest things about traveling. For no matter where you go, you’re going to find worlds upon worlds spinning and lives upon lives being lived, and if we’re lucky, we’ll get to be part of them, if only for a moment.

Aran (Islands) Aran So Far Away (Ireland Day #4)

I had been nervous about Day 4 since the start solely because a boat was involved. Having a very weak stomach, I’m not one that thrives on the open water, so as I got ready that morning, I took care in breathing in and drugging up (a.k.a the opposite of what D.A.R.E taught me). I popped Dramamine like nobody’s business, and when we got to the dock I rolled up my sleeves, prepared to throw elbows to get ensure I got a window seat.

As it turned out, my thorough preparation would prove key, as there were uncommonly high winds at the time of boarding, causing the 45 minute ferry ride to be somewhat of a nightmare for a number of passengers. And even though I felt no signs of seasickness, I can honestly tell you that I hated every minute of that damn ride. When we docked I had to resist the urge to kiss the ground, and I wondered if I should try to find a house to buy on the island so that I’d never have to ferry back.

That morning on the coach, as we made the hour drive to the dock, Tim told us our options for exploring the Aran Islands were walking, biking, or a horse drawn carriage, you know, casual stuff. And while the prospect of Seabiscuit trotting us around was enticing, Natalee and I opted for bikes, as we were feeling slightly more confident in our abilities after Kilkenny.

Now, note how I said, “were feeling.” I don’t use this phrasing to express an opinion I had in a previous moment, but an opinion that is no longer physically present in my body, as about 10 minutes after we started biking, I remembered why I don’t ride bikes: IT’S HARD. The moment the road took on even the slightest hint of incline my quads practically started laughing. And by the time we reached the top of the first hill I was fuming mad, considering amputation and practically screaming at Natalee to “pull over” so I could “take a picture” (a.k.a breathe and reconsider everything I’d eaten in the last 4 months).

Here is one picture I took on said break, note how happy and adorable Natalee is (#ThighsOfSteel):

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After the initial hill, the remaining bike ride proved to be quite enjoyable, save for, you know, a few other hills which also made me want to die. But each one proved worth it as they continued to give us incredible views:

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Back on the ferry—which proved far better the second time—our group was one big beaming mess of exhaustion. We were all in agreement that we’d have a great day, and even more so that it was bedtime. Before we crashed out however, once our boat docked we drove straight into Galway for a buffet dinner at Crows. We shuffled in, sunburned and starving, and found a table of food which consisted of (ddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417bdrumrollddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417b) Irish stew with lamb and potatoes, chicken, potato salad, pasta salad, baked potatoes, and profiteroles (a.k.a heaven in a pastry).

After dinner Natalee and I, along with many others, opted for showers and an early bedtime rather than a night out. And while I appreciated it then for the opportunity to get some extra sleep, I can appreciate it even more now. For as I lay there, hair wet, and eyes heavy, I was able to look back at the day we’d just had; each moment taking ample time to settle in my memory.

When I think of it now, I can’t help but go back to one moment when we were biking down a flat patch of road. We were up pretty high in the hills, giving us a 360 view of grass, sky and ocean, when suddenly it started to rain. At first, we didn’t know what to do. We looked up at the stormy sky that had once been so blue and we groaned, wondering if we should quit and find shelter. But then, as the rain started to run down the lenses of our sunglasses and wet the skin on our cheeks, we both got the same feeling. Natalee looked at me with a smile on her face and I smiled back because it was clear that this rain felt different than the average drizzle, cleansing rather than bothersome. We were on bikes on an island in Ireland, free as ever, and the rainwater was washing us clean of all the problems we might have been holding onto when we boarded the ferry that morning. And so we kept going, our pedaling on beat with the rhythm of the rain, and I shook my hair out feeling unmistakably happily, undeniably alive.

A Mouthful of Blarney (Ireland Day #3)

On the morning of Day 3 I started to finally feel like I was caught up in terms of jet lag. I had slept immensely better than the first night and so as we boarded the coach, once again at a sharp 8:15, I was feeling ready for the day ahead.

As promised, after Tim boarded the bus he put on our day song, the act of which set off a wave of bobbing heads and tired smiles. Once it was finished, he stood up and detailed the day’s activities, the first of which was Blarney Castle.

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We would be given a solid few hours to spend on the castle grounds to look around and thus were encouraged to do and see as much as possible. Arguably the most important item on the checklist was to kiss the Blarney Stone.

Now the history of the stone is a bit of a mystery, thus leaving room for a few theories, including one that states the stone was that which Moses struck his staff on to part the Red Sea. Whether or not that is true, God only knows, but after that no one can say how or why the stone ended up at the castle. Regardless, the story goes that in the 16th century Queen Elizabeth I asked that the Lord of Blarney, Cormac Teith McCarthy, be stripped of all his land. But as he made his way to see the Queen, he came across a woman who told him to kiss a specific stone, the result of doing so allowed him to convince the Queen to change her mind. So the hope is, that should you kiss the stone, you too will be given this gift of eloquence or the Gift of the Gab.

If you’ve never heard of the Blarney Stone, as I hadn’t, you might be reading this story thinking it sounds easy. You drive up, kiss a rock, and then suddenly your Morgan Freeman able to convince the world to give you anything you want if only you’ll read them a bedtime story. But it’s not so simple. Upon arriving at the castle, you are required to walk up multiple flights on a spiraling staircase until you reach the top level, which gives you awful views like this:

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You then walk along the outer edges of the top floor until you reach a seated Irish man who tells you to lie down on your back. Casual. Once on your back, he slides you towards the wall and asks you to grab onto two mounted black bars for stability. Then, when you are ready, he slides you even further in, the ground now slanted downward, and your head completely upside down and you pull yourself in, plant one on the smooth stone, and then let the Irish man pull you back up while you ponder what just happened.

Let it also be noted that there is no sexy way to do this:

 

After both me and my sister kissed the stone, we made our way back down the stairs and out into the castle’s gardens where we both agreed that we could live forever.

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We also found some time to tour the largest souvenir shop in Ireland where we picked up more than a few gifts for some friends and family, including a mini hurling stick for my brother. This purchase in particular sparked a conversation between me and the cashier, during which he explained why American football players are weak for wearing pads. On any other day I might have been defensive, as I love my football, but after remembering what I’d already learned about hurling—that it is a cross between field hockey and lacrosse, minus the padding and any sense of fear apparently—I couldn’t help but nod along, saying, “you’re right.”

From Blarney Castle, we headed to one of my most anticipated destinations: the Cliffs of Moher (pronounced More).

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Now, almost immediately after we got off the bus, the winds picked up. And when I say picked up, I mean PICKED UP. It also started to sprinkle. But you see, when the wind is blowing say 30-40 miles per hour, a drop of rain starts to closely resemble a missile, so there is no doubt in my mind we looked absolutely insane as we made our way along the scenic cliffs, laughing hysterically with our tightened hoods and seemingly drunken diagonal steps.

Thankfully, the rain never came down hard enough for me to put my camera away, allowing me to get some pretty good shots, especially when the clouds momentarily parted and we got some sun. As for the wind, it was the Drago to our selfie stick’s Apollo Creed. Every time we tried to be as tourist-tastic as possible, a gust would blow by, nearly taking my sister’s phone along with it. On the brightside, it made for some humorous pictures:

Once we’d successfully braved the elements, we headed to the information building to grab some lunch from the café (a panini, of course, with a side of chips. What kind of chips, you ask? Do I even need to say it? ddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417bddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417bddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417bddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417b)

Back on the coach, we made our way to Galway where, after checking into our hotel, we had a brief walking tour around the city from Tim. One highlight was the city’s jewelry store, home to the traditional Irish Claddagh Ring, which is comprised of three main elements: the heart, which represents love, the crown, which represents loyalty, and the hands, which represent friendship. We also learned about the traditions associated with how to wear the ring (the point of the heart pointed up your index finger or into your hand) and on which hand (the right representing single or dating, and the left, engaged or married). Natalee and I each bought one, but unfortunately did not find an Irish man to move it to the left hand while we were there. #NextTime

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For dinner we went to a place called Monroe’s, which was relatively crowded with people who came to watch the futbol (soccer) game and then for the live music afterwards. After scanning the menu, I tried to go for a more traditional dish, opting for Irish stew with…ddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417bmashed potatoes!ddecf0ced88cca47ff9a9f32330c417b which was more or less a pile of hot Irish meat or, if I held it up in the air, a mirror for the surrounding crowd.

From there, we went to a bar called Clancy’s, where a live band played a variety of popular songs ranging anywhere from AC/DC to Imagine Dragons. Our group remained relatively buttoned together in a corner of the dance floor, drinking and laughing and singing our hearts out, cheersing the end of one day and inviting the adventures of another.

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