cooking blog

Strain then Stir (Episode 2): How to be Ingredient Conscious

Hello and welcome back to another episode of Strain Then Stir, a no-cameras, diary-esque cooking show blog where I attempt to transform myself from a two-meal Tina into a full course Frank…or at the very least, be capable of feeding myself more than cereal and pasta.

On our last episode, I dove into the depths of Kayla Itsines’ cookbook The 28-Day Bikini Body Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Guide. I learned how to bring toast to the next level, how yogurt and sweet potatoes can make sweet sweet food children, and how to better utilize my Panini maker to its full potential. If you haven’t already, read all about those adventures here, then come back and dive in for episode two!

Coming off last month’s installment I have been an overwhelming amount of B-U-S-Y. Most prominently, I went on a weeklong trip with my best friend at the end of September. Since I knew I’d be away, I was less than motivated to go to the grocery store, so I decided that since I did a little bit of an overbuy on my last shopping trip, I’d make it last. I scrounged and got creative, using as much as I could with what I had leftover. Let’s just say I had a lot of cheese and crackers for lunch and I made a lot of rice and pasta for dinner.

Once I got back from my trip, I went grocery shopping again. And with all the recipes I recently learned swirling around in my head, I felt much better equipped to buy things that went together rather than a bunch of things that looked good. I quickly came to learn however, that this knowledge is only half the battle when it comes to being both a good cook and a responsible eater.

As a single person mostly making meals for one, I’ve become well acquainted with having leftover meals. However, in going through Kayla Itsines’ book, I also became familiar with leftover ingredients. Oftentimes a recipe only called for half a can of diced tomatoes or 1/3 of a sliced zucchini, etc. etc. As a result, I would store the extra ingredients in the refrigerator and then try to find a recipe for the next night that would put them to use.

This past month, I tried to utilize that same mindset. Even though I wasn’t following a specific cookbook, I tried to my best to be ingredient conscious and would do everything I could to incorporate last night’s leftovers into tomorrow’s recipes. As a result, almost nothing went to waste!

So for this month, even though I didn’t learn any new recipes per say I did discover some creative twists on recipes I already knew. For example, after remaking the sweet potato pizza recipe I learned last month, I threw the leftover sweet potato and red onions in an omelet which, spoiler alert: was DELICIOUS!

I also learned that our tendency to look around our kitchen and say, “I have nothing to make,” is often as truthful as a bad morning’s proclamation of “I have nothing to wear!” Oftentimes there is something to make, you just have to look a little closer and get a little more creative. These two lessons, I believe, are key to becoming any sort of cook. And so as I continue to improve my cooking skills, I too will further my practice of using what I’ve got and ensuring as little as possible goes to waste.

Here’s to next month’s cooking adventures!

Strain then Stir: A New Cooking Segment (Kind of)

Hello friends, my name is Kim, and I am a terrible cook. Okay, not terrible. Not great, though. A hard average if I’m being honest. A passing grade but not one to hang on the fridge, if you catch my drift.

I’m also a rather monotonous cook. I have a schedule, a limited bank account and only a handful of recipes I can make from memory, so I often make the same things over and over and over again.

And while I’m someone that thrives on routines, I’ve started to feel like a robot. Like I’m eating what I’m eating only because it’s what I usually eat when I usually eat it. As a result, I’m never really excited about eating because it feels more like something to check off my to-do list rather than something to enjoy or cherish.

On my recent trip to Hawaii, each meal felt like a celebration and an expression of passion. Every meal was healthy and delicious and unique and vibrant. It was the kind of food that makes you feel good while you’re eating it and after you eat it, which was new for me.

When I got back home, I was desperate to continue this I can enjoy all kinds of foods in all kinds of ways and don’t have to eat so much that I feel disgusting all the time lifestyle, and so, like any average yet determined cook/honest yet sarcastic writer would (and should) do, I’ve decided to document this journey.

DISCLAIMER/INTENSE REMINDER: I am not a chef, thus this segment is not going to be your run of the mill cooking blog. There will not be pretty, studio-esque pictures. There will not be sage advice. There will not be perfection. There will tales of disaster and frequent admissions of “oops.” There will be a lot of recapping of panicked Googling and pictures of the too many dishes I dirtied while trying to be professional. There may even be some utensil related injuries. Basically, this will be a series of me trying to cook and then writing about what went wrong—because trust me, something always goes wrong—and then hoping that you can relate, laugh, and (somehow) be inspired to cook as well.

As far as names go, I’ve decided to fondly refer to this new segment as “Strain Then Stir,” which recalls one of my most shining moments in the kitchen that you can read about here.

The first post will be up tomorrow, and will continue on a monthly basis until I either: 1) become a world famous chef with her own show on Food Network or 2) burn the house down, throw in the towel and shift my marital focus to a world famous chef with their own show on Food Network. Only time will tell.